Shineanthology’s Weblog

An anthology of optimistic, near future SF

Awards Pimpage: SHINE stories + Three Real-Life Links

Since several award nomination time slots just opened, I will list the Shine stories that are eligible (well, all of them except “Summer Ice” which is a reprint), with their word count.

Short stories (less than 7500 words):

  • The Greenman Watches the Black Bar Go Up, Up, Up — Jacques Barcia: 7000 words (excerpt);
  • Sustainabe Development — Paula R. Stiles: 1000 words (excerpt);
  • The Solnet Ascendancy — Lavie Tidhar: 3400 words (excerpt) + (podcast);
  • Twittering the Stars — Marie Ness: 6400 words (excerpt);
  • Seeds — Silvia Moreno-Garcia: 1700 words (excerpt) + (full story @ HUB);
  • Scheherazade Cast in Starlight — Jason Andrew: 1000 words (excerpt);
  • Castoff World — Kay Kenyon: 5200 words (excerpt) + (podcast) + (full story @ io9);
  • Paul Kishosha’s Children — Kenn Edgett: 7000 words (excerpt);

Novelettes (7500 – 17500 words):

  • The Earth of Yunhe — Eric Gregory: 8000 words (excerpt) + (podcast);
  • Overhead — Jason Stoddard: 9800 words (excerpt);
  • The Church of Accelerated Redemption — Gareth L. Powell & Aliette de Bodard: 10,000 words (excerpt);
  • At Budokan — Alastair Reynolds: 8200 words (excerpt);
  • Sarging Rasmussen: A Report by Organic — Gord Sellar: 10,000 words (excerpt) + (podcast @ StarShipSofa);
  • Russian Roulette 2020 — Eva Maria Chapman: 10,000 words (excerpt);
  • Ishin — Madeline Ashby: 9000 words (excerpt);

Excerpts of every story + four podcasts + two full stories online. If I give away anything more, the publisher will strangle me…;-)

Thanks everybody for your consideration.

Now, to spice things up a little. I came across three real-life events — sometimes via/via — that do have links to a few Shine stories.

First, via an article in the Guardian about how ‘green’ the UK’s coalition government (who promised to be “the greenest government ever”) actually is, I came upon this documentary: “The World According to Monsanto“, about the power politics of this huge GM company. It reminded me immediately of the fictional company Germingen in Silvia Moreno-Garcia’s “Seeds“.

Second, a Facebook post of (someone whose name escapes me: my apologies!) linked to an article on the New York Times’ Opinionator: “To Beat Back Poverty, Pay the Poor“. Indeed, successful government programs for that are running in Mexico (where “Seeds” is set) and in Brazil: which immediately brought the opening section of Jacques Barcia’s “The Greenman Watches the Black Bar Go Up, Up, Up” (which takes place in a Brazil that is much less poor).

Third, directly from the Guardian: “Nigeria: the Happiest People on Earth“. Counterintuitive, right? With all this trouble in the Niger delta where Shell is exploring oil? The country of the same-titled internet scams? And immense poverty?

Well, read the article: it’s not only doom and gloom, and these people are trying to change things for the better. And they keep a positive outlook throughout, just like the women in Paula R. Stiles’ “Sustainable Development“. In the Gallup  Poll “Global Barometer of Hope and Despair for 2011” (opens PDF: the ‘Net Hope’ scores are on page 61) Nigeria ranks highest, with a score of 70. Vietnam (61) and Brazil and Ghana (both 47) are numbers two and three. France ranks as the most desperate: a negative score of -58, followed by Iceland (-51), Romania (-47) and the UK (-44).

If anything, that poll demonstrates that money doesn’t (necessarily) make you happy.

UPDATE 1: via John Shirley (on Facebook) I was pointed to this MSNBC article: “US Building a Network to Hit Militants“, about the use of drones. A few quotes:

Its targeting advice will largely direct elite special operations forces in both commando raids and drone missile strikes overseas.

Several military intelligence officials said the center is the brainchild of JSOC’s current commander, Vice Adm. Bill McRaven, who patterned it on the success of a military system called “counter-network,” which uses drone, satellite and human intelligence to drive operations on the ground in Iraq and Afghanistan, according to a senior U.S. official reached Wednesday.

Which immediately reminded me of Madeline Ashby’s “Ishin“, in which a more positive application of the same technology is explored. Picture of the Predator Drone courtesy of the Support Daniel Boyd’s Blog, which has this choice quote:

The “pilots” say that the greatest problem is stress from “detachment.”

Which is exactly what one of Ishin‘s protagonists — Brandon — is suffering from. Hell of a well-researched and finely wrought story, that becomes more relevant by the day.

UPDATE 2: via de Volkskrant, I found “Young Children Share the Spoils” on Psychological Science. This research seems to suggest that sharing is innate. So I couldn’t help but think of Holly Phillips’s “Summer Ice“, where Manon shares a lot with the new community she’s moved into, and it pays back (with dividends).

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